Doctoral degrees for concrete scientists

Doctoral degrees for concrete scientists

November 9, 2010

Two of Norut Narvik’s scientists have recently presented their Doctoral dissertations on degradation of concrete constructions.

During the autumn two of Norut Narvik’s scientists graduated with PhDs from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Both scientists have worked on topics that deal with degradation of concrete structures. This work has been a central component of Norut Narvik’s strategic institute programme “RECON – Renewal of CONcrete infrastructure” financed by the Research Council of Norway.

Degradation of concrete structures is an extremely challenging issue which is threatening our built infrastructure. The main cause is corrosion of the reinforcement.

In Norway this represents a particularly major threat as an extremely high number of constructions is placed in or near seawater, such as bridges and wharves. In addition, substantial amounts of salt are used to prevent roads from freezing during the winter.

Irina Sæther

In her PhD thesis, Irina Sæther has applied advanced nonlinear numerical simulations in order to study how corrosion and subsequent repair influences the properties of the construction such as strength and rigidity.

Her thesis is entitled “Structural Behaviour of Deteriorated and Retrofitted Concrete Structures”. The Doctoral project has been a collaborative project between Norut Narvik, NTNU and Luleå University of Technology (LTU), with Professors Terje Kanstad (NTNU), Björn Täljsten (LTU) and Karl Vincent Høiseth (NTNU) as her academic supervisors.

Irina Sæther comes originally from St. Petersburg in Russia and has a Master’s degree in Integrated Building Technology from Narvik University College. She has been employed at Norut Narvik since 2004.

Mahdi Chini

Mahdi Chini has in his Doctoral thesis “Pan-based carbon fibre as anode material in cathodic protection for concrete structures” worked to find out how carbon fibres can be used as anodes in cathodic protection. Cathodic protection is today a preferred method for stopping the development of chloride initiated reinforcement corrosion.

The development of new anode materials is important in order to reduce costs and increase the application of the method. Through his Doctoral project, Chini has made an important contribution to mapping how carbon fibres can be used as anodes in cathodic protection of concrete constructions.

The Doctoral project has been a collaborative project between Norut Narvik, NTNU and Maxit Group, with Professor Øystein Vennesland (NTNU), Dr Roy Anthonsen (former Norut) and Dr John Håvard Mork (Maxit Group) as academic supervisors.

Mahdi Chini comes originally from Iran and has been employed at Norut Narvik for his entire research fellowship.