Technology crosses borders

Technology crosses borders

June 17, 2010

More than 1000 people in 70 countries watched films streamed via the internet from the Nordic Youth Film Festival (NUFF) in Tromsø – and a filmmaker in Gaza paid extra attention.

 

More than 1000 people in 70 countries throughout all the world’s continents watched films via the internet at the same time as they were screened in the cinema at NUFF in 2010.A film by a young Palestinian filmmaker was on the programme at this year’s NUFF in Tromsø, which runs from June 4-13. Owing to departure problems from Gaza, neither the filmmaker nor other film enthusiasts from Palestine had the possibility to attend NUFF.Far North Living Lab made parts of the festival available using experimental internet technology, which made it possible to follow the festival from behind the blockades in Gaza. The feedback from Gaza is that the stream quality was unsurpassed and that the young filmmaker could follow the film programme from NUFF on his home computer.“We are proud that we could contribute to making culture accessible across closed borders,” says Research Scientist Njål Borch from Norut Tromsø.“This is a classic example of censorship and control over a group of people,” says Borch. “It is precisely people like this who get the most out of the openness of the internet. We are extremely happy that the filmmakers in Gaza could get access to films of impressive quality from NUFF.”This is not the first time that the file sharing technology BitTorrent was used from the cinema. In October 2009, Far North Living Lab streamed a silent film concert from the Aurora Cinema in Tromsø. On that occasion the main recipient was the Notch Festival in Beijing.Visit the Far North Living Lab online: http://www.farnorthlivinglab.org/Contact people:Research Scientist Njål Borch, Norut TromsøResearch Scientist Ellen Brox, Norut Tromsø